Where to Stay in New York City with a Youth Group

Planning a a NYC trip for a youth group
Designed by famed Architect Richard Morris Hunt and built in 1883, the HI Hostel features dormer windows and a mansard roof. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

As a family traveler writer and a youth group leader, I got voted to plan our trip to New York City for a handful of high school girls. Packed with an itinerary full of museums and must-dos, I needed budget-friendly lodging for a group. My go-to for Europe, a HI hostel, provided what I needed to plan a NYC trip for a youth group on a budget.

Our mission, to learn urban travel skills so the girls had the skills they needed to travel the world as young adults.

Urban Travel Skills

What are urban travel skills? Knowing how to travel in urban areas using public transportation along with budget-friendly lodging options.

Planning a NYC trip for a youth group. Plan on using the subway.
Buy a Metrocard and use the subway, just a block away from the HI Hostel in New York City. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Traveling in the U.S. is a bit different than traveling other parts of the developed world. Travel can be expensive in the U.S. especially for young adults and college students who don’t have reliable cars or are too young to rent cars.

Traveling exclusively by air is expensive and cumbersome. Just think about hauling yourself and your luggage to-and-from airports without the use of a car. Train travel, like Amtrak, is inconsistent throughout the U.S.

I wanted to teach our girls how to travel using different modes of transportation, like subways, ferries, commuter trains, trams, ride-share and cabs. To do that, New York City topped my list for destinations more than any other urban center.

Planning a NYC trip to a youth group take the Roosevelt Island Tram for fun.
New York City offers many modes of transportation, like the Roosevelt Island Tram along with ferries, commuter trains, cabs and subways. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

With transportation figured out, I wanted to show the girls where to stay when traveling on their own as young adults. During my 20s, I strapped on a backpack and explored Europe with a rail pass and hostel membership card. It was fun and I wanted to give the girls the confidence to do it on their own.

Hosteling 101

A hostel is an inexpensive place to stay that provides basic lodging for all. Some are private and others are part of a federation, like Hosteling International.

Hosteling International (HI) is a federation of 70 national youth hostel associations. Formerly known as the International Youth Hostel Federation, Hosteling International began in 1932 and is classified as a charity.

Planning a youth group or student trip to New York City, it can be overwhelming especially with a limited budget. Top of the list, where to stay while exploring NYC. I've got all the information about staying at the HI Hostel in New York City with high school students.

Years back, there was an age limit for hostels but that’s been eliminated at most hostels. Open to all, though it still appeals to college-age students.

Planning a NYC trip for a Youth Group

According to HI, a group is 10 or more people traveling together. For students under 18, the group must be in a room of their own and have adult chaperones staying at the hostel.

Hosteling International caters to groups with a special reservation line to handle groups sales. For our nine-person group, we bought out a ten-bunk room.

Breakfast can be prearranged for a reasonable cost. Sack lunches can also be prearranged.  Luggage can be stored before and after the stay. Free tours and entertainment are available at the hostel too.

HI Hostel NYC

Located in the Upper West Side between 103rd and 104th Streets along Amsterdam Ave., the HI Hostel is actually an historic building. Designed by Richard Morris Hunt, the famed architect of the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty and the Biltmore Estate, the hostel was built in 1883.

Originally for the Association for the Relief of Respectable Aged Indigent Females, the building offers dormer windows and a mansard roof along with rich architecture details throughout the building.

The HI Hostel NYC offers free Wi-Fi, free linens, a coin-operated, self-service laundry, a kitchen to use, a café, a game room, along with an outdoor courtyard. Space for your group to meet is also available. The hostel can assist in charter bus parking too.

Our Dorm Room at the HI Hostel New York City

A reasonably sized room featured five sets of twin-sized bunks with sheeting and a couple of fleece blankets per bed, think basic linens. Daily towel service was available though we had to grab towels off the laundry cart. Used towels are deposited in the bathrooms.

Planning a NYC trip for a youth group then think about staying in a hostel.
Urban camping at the HI Hostel in New York City with bunks beds the girls loved. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Our room was dim with just a single light fixture but it featured two large windows with black-out shades. We had air-conditioning with the controls in our room. A bonus since we visited in the summer and New York is hot and humid.

Each bunk features an overhead light with a couple of standard 110-volt household outlets. I plugged in my phone and left it on the light fixture and charging station.

Planning a NYC trip for a youth group, a hostel offers budget-friendly lodging.
Each bunk gets a metal school-type locker to store luggage and I purchased a lock for $4 from the lobby. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Each bunk also has a standard school-type metal locker though I forgot to bring a lock. I purchased one in the registration area for $4. The locker fit my standard carryon-sized rolling luggage with no problem.

The Shared Bathroom at the HI Hostel NYC

I found two bathrooms on each floor. Each was newly renovated with white tile and individual stalls for toilets and showers.

Planning a NYC trip for a youth group then book a stay at the HI Hostel.
The outdoor courtyard features Ping-Pong along with lots of seating. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The vanity features several sinks with lots of lighting and plugs for hair dryers. I never had to wait for a stall or sink though other people were always in the bathroom.

Shared Space at the HI Hostel New York City

The main floor of the hostel features a registration and reception area open to the public. A set of locked doors to the rest of the facility require a key card to open, just like a regular hotel.

Planning a NYC trip for a youth group, the hostel offers a cafe.
The cafe, located on the first floor, offered quick-service items along with a coffee bar and beverage cooler. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The café serves fresh coffee drinks along with assorted pastries. Cold and hot sandwiches are available along with salads, yogurt, fruit and cold, bottled drinks. I found the prices reasonable, especially for NYC and it offered extended hours.

A large dining area, game room, computer room, and lounging room completed the first floor. I also found restrooms, stairs and an elevator.

Planning a NYC trip for a youth group consider the HI Hostel NYC.
The HI Hostel in New York City offers a game room with free pool. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The HI Hostel New York City features a large outdoor patio. Guests gathered under the party lights and enjoyed talking with several tables and chairs. I even found a Ping-Pong table and hammock outside.

My Take Away from the Hostel

Our stay was a great experience for the girls. For girls who have attended camp, it was very camp-like. And I called it Urban Camping.

It was a bit like college dorm living too. So that gave them a taste of what’s ahead. None of the girls had any complaints and fought over the top bunks.

For a Mom, the beds were OK. My bunk mate, my 14-year-old, made the bed squeak and shake each time she flipped over in her sleep.

Walking down the hall to the restroom got old after several days. After a week, I was ready to have some private space. But this trip wasn’t about me, it was teaching kids how to travel within their budget.

The location was great. Two blocks to Central Park and one block for the 1 subway train. We used the subway to get around extensively.

The area was safe though we were aware and traveled as a group at night.

Things to Think About:

Some of the guests were under-dressed for the public spaces. Think college-aged dudes roaming the halls without shirts and girls in tiny shorts. But my Mom googles were on and we really saw more flesh in Times Square.

Hostel Must Haves:

  • Flip flops for shower and walking around the room.
  • Earplugs and eye mask. NYC is noisy.
  • Electronic chargers and even a small surge protector if you have multiple devices.
  • A lock for the locker.
  • A plug-in air freshener if staying with students for several days.
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Discover Utah’s Bryce Canyon to Share Fun and Adventure

Discover Utah's Bryce Canyon with kids
Discover the pink spires at Bryce Canyon National Park. Photo Credit: National Park Service

Discover Utah’s technicolor show where the delicate pink of a sunrise pops into vermillion red then rusts into a sunset orange. Bryce Canyon National Park offers expansive views at every turn in the trail. The Paunsaugunt Plateau’s dramatic scenery is a hiker’s dream and draws visitors from around the world.

History of Bryce Canyon National Park

What started as an inland sea approximately 40 million years ago until 20 million years ago when the Colorado Plateau began to rise and dry out. Bryce Canyon’s rainbow-colored limestone layers actually represent different eras of time.

Explore the Bryce Canyon River when you explore Bryce Canyon with kids.
Catch the Bryce Canyon River as it snakes through the firs at the bottom of the canyon. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Bryce Canyon is located on the top portion of the Grand Staircase, a sequence of sedimentary rock layers in northern Arizona and southern Utah. It offers a geologic survey of 525 million years displayed in exposed rock. Where Grand Canyon National Park represents the bottom of the Grand Staircase, Zion National Park offers a glimpse of the center.

Ebenezer Bryce, a Mormon Pioneer and Bryce Canyon’s namesake, settled in the area and at times seemed obvious to its haunting beauty. Bryce Canyon National Park earned its national park designation in 1928.

What to do in 2 hours

On my first visit, I had limited time so after grabbing a map at the Visitor Center I hopped a complimentary park shuttle. At the Sunrise Point stop, I headed to the Rim Trail, a paved path running next to the edge. To walk from Sunrise Point to Sunset Point is an easy 1.0-mile hike.

NOTE: This path doesn’t feature a fence next to the canyon but is approximately 10 feet off the rim’s edge.

Walk through Bryce Canyon Lodge when you explore Bryce Canyon with kids.
The historic Bryce Canyon Lodge offers guests rooms steps away from the rim of the canyon. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

For more adventurous families, the Navajo Trail offers an up-close look at Bryce’s rock formations as the trail takes hikers into Bryce Amphitheater’s slot canyon. It starts at Sunset Point and is a 1.3-mile moderate trail.

I walked over to the Bryce Canyon Lodge to tour the historic park building. Inside I found restrooms along with a large gift shop, a restaurant and a ballroom that hosts ranger programs.

Explore Utah's Bryce Canyon National Park for family fun and adventure. With cabins, hikes and horseback rides, families can make memories together as they discover the pink spires of Utah.

After exploring from Sunrise to Sunset Points, I headed for Inspiration Point. Close but yet another vantage point of the Bryce Amphitheater then boarded the shuttle bus for the roundtrip ride back to the visitor center.

Family Fun in Bryce Canyon National Park

For older kids who love adventure, explore Bryce Canyon by horseback with a one-and-half hour guided tour that takes small groups to Fairy Castle and back. A three-hour tour explores the Peek-a-Boo Loop by horseback as well.

Take a hike when you explore Bryce Canyon with kids.
Kids love to hike and Bryce Canyon National Park offers several family hiking trails. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Bryce Canyon National Park hosts two summer festivals. An Annual Astronomy Festival in June and an Annual Geology Festival in July for visitors looking for specialized programming.

Bryce Canyon National Park features night sky programming. The park’s dark rangers, who specialize in the night sky, host programs to see a world beyond the naked eye.

Outfitted with high-powered telescopes, dark rangers point viewfinders on the Milky Way and nursery nebulae. On full moons, dark sky rangers guide visitors through Bryce Canyon on moonlit hikes.

Bryce Canyon with Kids

The Junior Ranger Program is the go-to program for families to learn more about Bryce Canyon National Park. It’s free and takes about two hours to complete. My kids love the patches that the Rangers present them after completing their booklet.

Lodging in Bryce Canyon National Park

Stay in a historic cabin when you explore Bryce Canyon with kids.
Reserve a cabin steps from Bryce Canyon’s rim to make memories with your kids. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

For lodging in the park, the rustic Bryce Canyon Lodge offers rooms in the 1925 historic lodge listed on the Register of Historic Places. The Bryce Canyon Lodge features a restaurant, a pizzeria along with lodge rooms and a few suites.

For guests looking for more space, western cabins are located steps from the canyon’s edge and the lodge. They offer rustic elegance in a more private setting.

Where’s Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park is located approximately 270 miles from Las Vegas, Nevada, to the south and 270 miles from Salt Lake City, Utah, to the north. Both cities offer international airports.

Bryce Canyon National Park offers a difference landscape and included in national park itineraries. It’s located 85 miles from Zion National Park. The North Rim of the Grand Canyon is 158 miles away.

Bryce Canyon National Park is open 365-days a year and 24-hours a day. Use an America the Beautiful annual pass ($80) or purchase a 7-day pass for $30 per private vehicle.

Bryce Canyon National Park offers a free seasonal shuttle bus from the visitor center every 15 minutes and stops at the lodge, the campgrounds and Sunset, Bryce, Inspiration and Sunset Points.

Know Before You Go:

  • Bryce Canyon has frequent thunderstorms during Monsoon season, June through August. For your safety, when thunder roars, head indoors.
  • Bryce Canyon doesn’t have a partial fence around the canyon like Grand Canyon. Hike with the kids within arm’s reach.
  • Take it easy at Bryce Canyon, elevations range from 6,600 to 9,100 ft
  • Seasonal road closure can occur during the winter.
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Take Your Kids to Prison for Family Fun

Alcatraz with Kids
On a clear day, Alcatraz doesn’t look that creepy but of course looks can be deceiving. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Why would you visit Alcatraz with kids? Well, Alcatraz topped the San Francisco to-do list for my kids, 9, 13 and 14. ALL DAY they asked, when are we going to Alcatraz. Seriously. And it was their favorite national park site of the summer after stopping at most of the national park sites on the West Coast, like Redwoods, Death Valley, Olympic, Mount St. Helens, Oregon Caves, Lassen Volcanic and Mt. Rainier.

A Prison with Kids?

I have boys and my boys are fascinated by prisons, along with a list of other things that most Moms don’t want to talk about. So I decided to tour the prison that defines hard-core prison life.

Explore Alcatraz with kids.
A walk through Alcatraz at twilight defines creepy for me. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

As a kid of the 80s, I’m all about scaring a couple of kids straight.  A walk through Alcatraz at twilight is creepy and borderline scary.But tweens and teens love to walk the line of scary and creepy so it’s perfect for them.

Though it’s not all creepy. The views of downtown San Francisco can’t be beat, really stunning. I booked the evening tour and the ferry ride along with the sunset were top-notch. Though I think we were lucky, remember that San Francisco fog!

Take a ferry to Alcatraz with kids.
On a clear afternoon, the view of downtown San Francisco can’t be beat. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

I had to see it for myself. Alcatraz is one of the places you have to visit to understand. Pictures can be haunting but walking through the cell block as the dabbled light casts a ghostly glow is eerie.

Alcatraz–What’s behind the name

Derived from the Spanish word alcatraces, or seabirds, the birds have called the island home for generations. In the 1850s, the island became a military fortress due to its strategic positioning in the San Francisco Bay.

Since the shipping traffic increased from San Francisco after the gold rush, a lighthouse was needed. In 1854 the Alacatraz Island Light became the first lighthouse on the West Coast.

During the Civil War, Alcatraz Island housed 400 soldiers and numerous cannons to protect the port. However, in 1907 the U.S. Army decommissioned Alcatraz.

The island always housed prisoners from the early days as a military fort. And soon after its decommission as a fort, military guards built a cellhouse.

Explore Alcatraz with kids and walk through the cell block.
A few of the cells on the tour feature personal belongings of the prisoners. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

In 1915, Alcatraz was renamed the United States Disciplinary Barracks, Pacific Branch, a military prison. During the Great Depression, Alcatraz transferred from the War Department to the Department of Justice. Soon after, it became a high-profile, maximum-security federal penitentiary.

Home to the worst of the worst, infamous inmates like Al Capone, along with others with nicknames like Creepy, Doc, Machine Gun, and Birdman of Alcatraz were all incarcerated on The Rock. Inmates that caused problems in other prisons, came to Alcatraz too.

Explore Alcatraz with kids during your trip to San Francisco.
Alcatraz offers few windows so the light is dim and spooky. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

After the prison closed in 1963, Native Americans occupied the island in effort to claim it for all tribes. Support dwindled and in 1972, Alcatraz became part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

Explore Alcatraz with Kids

Alcatraz is creepy and eerie in the evening so the younger kids might be frightened by the night tour. My kids, 9, 13 and 14, loved this tour but tweens and teens love to be freaked out a bit. Actually Alcatraz was their favorite national park site from the entire summer.

Explore Alcatraz with Kids when you visit San Francisco.
My kids, 9, 13 and 14, loved this tour because its was equal parts eery and creepy. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Hard to believe, yet kids lived on Alcatraz as prison guards lived on the island and brought their families with them. The kids of Alcatraz played in the gardens and Moms rarely locked their doors.

Stop by the Ranger Station at the dock and pick up a Junior Ranger booklet. Take the tour, finish the booklet and turn it back in to the park ranger for a special badge.

Night Tour

Tour Alcatraz with kids during your trip to San Francisco.
The hospital ward creeps out adults and younger kids might want to skip it. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

We explored Alcatraz during the twilight hours for the Night Tour. A special feature of this tour is the cell house lock-down where a Park Ranger unlocks then locks all the cell doors on the cell block at once. A must if you take the Night Tour.

This tour is especially creepy since the setting sun casts deep shadows throughout the prison. The lighting is limited and the hospital ward is particularly eery in the evening. It might be too scary for younger kids, my 9-year-old decided to skip this portion of the tour.

Lock the kids up when you tour Alcatraz with kids.
Sometimes good kids go bad. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The Birds of Alcatraz

The birds came first, though moved on after humans occupied the island in the 1850s. When the prison closed in the 1963, the birds returned to the protected location that lacked natural predators.

The island offers refuge for over 5,000 birds today. The waterbirds include Pigeon Guillemots, Snowy Egrets, Western Gulls, Black-crowned Night-Herons and Brandt’s Cormorants. Some areas of the island may close to protect nesting birds that will abandon their nest if humans come too close.

Is a tour of Alcatraz Prison right for your kids? Find out the best time to visit and what to except for one of the most popular tours in San Francisco.

Birders, remember your binoculars and grab the brochure, Waterbirds of Alcatraz, at the kiosk after disembarking the ferry.

The Gardens of Alcatraz

The gardens that still bloom off the most surprising feature of the former high-security prison. Sprinkled throughout the property, residents first planted the gardens in the late 1800s.

Visit the gardens when you explore Alcatraz with kids.
Gardens sprinkle Alcatraz Island, planted and maintained by former inmates. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

With the help of reclaimed water, green houses and specially-trained inmates, the gardens flourished until 1963, when the prison closed. Over 230 species of ornamental plants still flourish on Alcatraz, including roses, calla lilies, bearded irises, agapanthus and hydrangeas.

Garden lovers, grab the brochure, The Gardens of Alcatraz, at the kiosk after disembarking the ferry for more information.

Get the App!

The National Park Service developed an NPS Golden Gate App, covering Alcatraz Island among other NPS sites around San Francisco. The app includes an interactive map, hidden stories and up-to-date ranger information.

Where to eat at Alcatraz

Got hungry kids? The Landing at Alcatraz, the ticketing and boarding area off The Embarcadero, offers a cafeteria with options for families along with rain ponchos and souvenirs. Food service is not available on Alcatraz Island.

Picnics are allowed near the docks when you disembark the ferry. Only bottled water is permitted on the tour.

Getting to Alcatraz Island

Alcatraz Island is located in the San Francisco Bay and reached by ferry only. The Alcatraz Ferry Terminal is located at Pier 33 on The Embarcadero.

Parking is an issue while visiting Downtown San Francisco. During my trip, I used public transportation and left my car at my hotel.

Alcatraz Cruises 2017 Tickets

Ages Day Tours Night Tour
Adult 18 to 61 37.25 44.25
Senior 62 + 35.25 41.25
Junior 12 to 17 37.25 43.25
Child 5 to 11 23.00 26.50
Toddler 0 to 4 Free Free
Family Pack 2 Adults + 2 Kids 112.75 Not Available

 

The Behind-the-Scenes Tour is 4 to 5 hours long and not available for kids under 12-years-old.

More Information about Alcatraz and San Francisco:

If you need more information about Alcatraz or San Francisco with kids, I recommend the Lonely Planet Guides, like the following.

 

Disclosure:

Consideration for brands mentioned. This post includes affiliate links.

Know Before You Go:

  • Tickets go on sale 90 days in advance.
  • Parking is an issue for San Francisco. I used public transportation during my visit.
  • Alcatraz Island, or ‘The Rock”, is hilly and requires climbing. Motorized transportation is limited.
  • Luggage larger than a standard backpack is not allowed.
  • Photo ID required for the purchaser of the tickets.
  • Give yourself at least 2-and-a-half hours for the tour.
  • Bring a jacket and rain gear since the weather is unpredictable.
  • Make reservations for this popular tour months in advance, especially for the evening tour.
  • In Mid-August flies that hatch from the bird colonies and swarm.
  • The Self-Guided booklet, Discover Alcatraz – A Tour of the Rock, costs $1.
  • The cost of the tour includes an audio tour headset.

 

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Discover a Land of Destruction at Mount St. Helens

 

Explore Mount St. Helens with kids.
Explore Mount St. Helens with kids to learn about the 1980 eruption that blew off a mountaintop. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Mount St. Helens, once a recreational playground for Washington, until one quiet Sunday morning in 1980 when the snowcapped mountain vaporized. A mudslide decimated a forest and a crater remained where a peak once stood. A scar in the landscape recovers and a trip to Mount St. Helens with kids is a must for your Washington road trip.

What happened at Mount St. Helens 

In 1792 British explorer Captain George Vancouver officially named Mount St. Helens after Baron St. Helens, an ambassador. Though the Cowlitz Indian Tribe and Yakama Nation’s name translates into the smoker, suggesting a history of volcanic activity.

Explore Mount St. Helens with kids while in Washington.
A one-mile wide crater dominates the landscape at Mount St. Helens. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

On March 20, 1980, a 4.2-magnitude earthquake rocked Mount St. Helens and jumpstarted the volcanic activity. The next week, steam started to vent. Volcanologists flew in from around the world to watch Mount St. Helens from every vantage point. By the end of April, a bulge appeared on the north side of the mountain.

After weeks intense monitoring, Mount St. Helens erupted on May 18, 1980, in a fury that geologists compared to Mount Vesuvius. Another earthquake, a 5.1-magnitude, melted the snowpack into a violent mudslide and pulverized the top of the stratovolcano into a cloud of black ash.

Explore Mount St. Helens with kids and learn about the 1980 eruption.
During our visit, we attended a ranger program to learn about the fateful day in May 1980. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

For the next 9 hours, a plume of ash soared 12 to 16 miles into the atmosphere that turned day into night. The eruption generated 3.9 million cubic yards of material, like ash, pumice, trees and boulders, that rushed 17 miles downstream.

In all, the eruption of Mount St. Helens killed 57 people. In its wrath, it destroyed 47 bridges, 15 miles of railroad, 185 miles of highway and 250 homes. It was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in U.S. history.

Explore Washington's Mount St. Helens with your kids to learn about the 1980 eruption along with the continued volcanic activity that rocks the area. Top of your adventure with a stay in a cozy off-the-grid cabin to ignite the imagination of your kids.

After the eruption, Mount St. Helens went from a 9,677-foot snow-capped peak to a 8,363-foot mountain with a one-mile wide, horseshoe-shaped crater. Since the 1980 eruption, Mount St. Helens continues to rumble, with intermittent episodes of venting steam and erupting lava domes. The majority of the area is closed to visitors so scientists can continue to monitor the volcanic activity.

What to do in 3 hours at Mount St. Helens 

Drive to the Johnston Ridge Observatory’s visitor center, at the end of State Route 504 (Spirit Lake Highway) and walk through the exhibits detailing the eruption. Watch one of the dramatic films and attend a ranger program, if available. Our program offered amazing historic photos of the eruption.

Explore Mount St. Helens with kids.
Take a hike and see how the landscape recovers at Mount St. Helens. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Kids need to move so we hiked the Eruption Trail, a .5-mile trail from the Visitor Center. See the lava dome and the crater along with a pumice plain and landslide deposit. If time permits, stop at the Loowit Viewpoint, just west of the Johnston Ridge Observatory.

Mount St. Helens with Kids

The Johnston Ridge Observatory is a must for school-age kids with geologic exhibits and live seismographs. The visitor center offers two different films, perfect for school-age kids. Though the movies might be intense for preschoolers and too loud for babies.

Explore Mount St. Helens with kids during your vacation to Washington.
My kids earned a Junior Ranger badge during our visit to Mount St. Helens with special Junior Ranger programming. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

During our visit to Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, my kids attended a Junior Ranger program that explained the eruption in a way a kid could understand. The program took less than an hour and parents are welcome to stay or explore the monument on their own.

Family Fun at Mount St. Helens 

Due to the delicate nature of the recovering landscape and the continued seismic activity, I found limited recreational activities at Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument’s Johnston Ridge Observatory. Visit other nearby locations.

  • Coldwater Lake Recreation Area offers a picnic area, an interpretive trail and a boat launch.
  • Mount St. Helens Visitor Center at Silver Lake is a Washington State Park that offers exhibits on the 1980 eruption. Located 6 miles from Castle Rock along State Route 504, it’s open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the summer season.
  • Try the eastside or southside of Mount St. Helens for more recreational activities, like Lava Canyon, Ape Cave or Spirit Lake viewpoints.
  • Eco Park Resorts offers horseback tours, the closest to Mount St. Helens, that ride through the blast zone.

Camping near Mount St. Helens 

For my visit to Mount St. Helens, I decided to stay as close as possible. At Eco Park Resort, just 25 miles west from the Johnston Ridge Observatory, I found several cozy, off-the-grid cabins along with tent and RV camping that unplugged my kids and recharged my spirit.

Visit Mount St. Helens with kids and stay in a nearby cabin.
We stayed in an off-the-grid cabin, minutes from the Johnston Visitor Center. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

With a flicker of the gas-powered lights, my kids, 9, 13 and 14, and I settled in for the night under our cozy patchwork quilts. Set in a pristine landscape in the shadow of Mount St. Helens, it’s hard to believe the destruction that happened here 37 years ago.

Our cabin featured a pair of bunk beds that’s my boys fought over (in a good way) and a full-sized bed, each dressed with a cozy quilts for the brisk Washington nights. Since the cabins lack electricity, two gas-powered, wall-mounted lamps lighted our cabin. The flickering glow ignited my boys’ pioneering imaginations.

Explore Mount St. Helens with kids and stay in a cozy cabin.
Inside our cabin, I found a pair of bunk beds along with a full-size bed, dressed with cozy quilts. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Inside our cabin, I found a table with four chairs, perfect for games after dinner. The long counter on one side of the cabin offered amble space for organizing camping equipment.

Outside our cabin, I made dinner on my gas camp stove, while my daughter swung on the cabin’s back porch swing. As we looked across the grassy meadow, we saw the first flickers of the nightly fire in Eco Park’s fire pit while my boys played in the late summer sun.

Explore Mount St. Helens with kids and stay at a cabin.
Steps from our cabin, the newly renovated bathroom had lots of hot water with a locking door and a flushing toilet. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The owners of Eco Park Resort, Dawn and Mark Smith, offer their personal experiences of the day that Mount St. Helens erupted. The Smith family resort, Spirit Lake Lodge fell victim to 500-feet of ash that day. As the land recovered, the Smith family returned and opened Eco Park Resort in 1995 at 14000 Spirit Lake Highway.

Where’s Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument

The Johnston Ridge Observatory is located 52 miles east of Castle Rock, Washington, along State Route 504 (Spirit Lake Highway). It’s located 110 miles northeast of Portland, Oregon, and 150 miles southeast of Seattle, Washington.

Both cities offer international airports. The closest towns with traveler’s services are Castle Rock or Kelso, both along Interstate 5. Public transportation is not available to the Johnston Ridge Observatory.

Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area offers a scenic drive, just 165 miles away. Astoria and the Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks offers more national park fun, 120 miles west.

Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument is open 7 days a week from mid-May until the end of October, from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Use an America the Beautiful annual pass ($80) or purchase an adult admission for $8 per person, kids 15 and under enter for free.

Know Before You Go: 

  • Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument’s Johnston Ridge Observatory is closed from the end of October until mid-May.
  • Mount St. Helens includes levels of restricted areas for the safety and protection of the recovering landscape.
  • Pets, bikes and horses are prohibited to protect the recovering landscape. Though a few bike trails are open.
  • Camping is prohibited at the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument.
  • Eco Park Resort is open from May until November and reservations are required.
  • Bring a battery-operated lantern for your stay at Eco Park Resort for additional lighting in the cabin and making after-dark runs to the potty.
  • Individual ground fires aren’t allowed at Eco Park Resort, though they light a fire pit that guests can enjoy. Remember the marshmallows!
  • Due to the remote location, Wi-Fi is not available at Eco Park Resort, though I had reliable cell service.
  • Since the cabin is off-grid, no electrical outlets are available in the cabin. Remember to charge the phone before arriving.
  • The cabins are heated though I didn’t turn of the heat for my stay.
  • The hot water is on a timer and the bathrooms contain showers only. The doors lock and if you have little kids, I recommend staying with them.
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Explore like a Kid in the Columbia River Gorge

Explore Timberline Lodge when you visit Columbia River Gorge with kids.
The Timberline Lodge on Mount Hood is one of Oregon’s seven natural wonders and a quick drive from the Columbia River Gorge. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Oregon boasts seven natural wonders, like Crater Lake and the Oregon Coast. Two of those destinations lie within miles of each other, a few hours from Portland.

Topping my list of scenic drives, the Columbia River Gorge protects over 80 river along Interstate 84. Along the majestic river, I found unbelievable waterfalls steps from the road. And what can be better than fresh fruit from the miles of Oregon orchards along the Fruit Loop.

Mount Hood stands tall as a beacon in northern Oregon. It offers season-to-season skiing and boarding along with the historic Timberline Lodge for national park lodge lovers.

Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

Discover the Columbia River Gorge with Kids.
Climb high above the river to see how mighty the Columbia River is. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The ice age 15,000 years ago created the Columbia River Gorge with its distinctive V-shape. With uncontrolled flooding and seasons of freeze-and-thaw, the Columbia River Gorge features a high concentration of waterfalls to the delight of waterfall chasers, like me.

The Native Americans used the Columbia River for transportation and trade, using wooden canoes to navigate the untamed river. In 1805 Lewis and Clark’s Expedition explored along the Columbia on their way to the Pacific.

Explore Fort Clatsop with kids and earn a Junior Ranger badge.
Explore Lewis and Clark sites in Oregon and Washington to earn a Junior Ranger patch. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The Army Corps of Engineers tamed the Columbia River falls in 1957 when it constructed the Bonneville Dam and The Dalles Dam. In 1986, Congress established the Columbia River Gorge as a national scenic area. 

Family Fun along the Columbia River

The Dalles

I started in The Dalles on the eastern edge the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Up first, the official interpretive center at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum where my kids, 9, 13 and 14, went to work on the museum’s scavenger hunts learning about the pioneers and Lewis and Clark.

The Columbia River Gorge tops my list for family fun in the Pacific Northwest. With something for everyone, my family found outdoor sports for every season, waterfalls, fields of fruit and flowers along with local shops and restaurants. Got all the details to plan your trip.

During our visit, we learned about the Oregon Trail pioneers and the natural resources of the Columbia River. The Lewis and Clark Expedition and Oregon canning industry get equal attention.

Open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Adult admission is $9, kids from 6 to 16 are $5 and kids 5 and under are free, located at 5000 Discovery Drive.

Explore the Columbia River Gorge with kids.
The Army Corps of Engineers built and operates the dams along the Columbia River. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Since the Army Corps of Engineers tamed the wild Columbia River, we visited The Dalles Lock and Dam. With a visitor center and a Junior Ranger activity booklet, my kids learned about the importance of dams, water safety and how fish use fish ladders.

Free and open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily from Memorial Day until Labor Day. Tour the dam with scheduled tours on summer weekends. The visitor center is located at 3545 Bret Clodfelter Way.

Hood River with Kids

Just 22 miles west of The Dalles, our next destination offers lots of agritourism. Hood River, bulges with wineries, orchards, farm stands and lavender fields.

Explore the Fruit Loop when you visit the Columbia River Gorge with kids.
Columbia River’s Fruit Loop offers endless fruit stands, like several cherry varieties you can only sample in Oregon. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The Fruit Loop starts in Hood River, a town along the Columbia River’s Interstate 84. With over 35 miles of country roads to meander, we spent an afternoon sampling endless fruit stands. Since it was cherry season we sampled every local variety, many too delicate to ship outside of the region.

I adore lavender so a stop at Hood River Lavender Farms (3801 Straight Hill Road) to pick my own lavender bouquets was mandatory. The gift shop offers lavender infused products and the bees seemed friendly.

Pick lavender at the lavender farm when you explore Columbia River Gorge with kids.
Stop and smell the lavender during the summer. I picked several bunches. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Kids love animals so we stopped at Cascade Alpacas and Foothills Yarn and Fiber (4207 Sylvester Drive). With spinning demonstrations, my kids learned how alpaca fur turns into yarn.

Waterfalls along the Columbia River Gorge 

The Columbia River Gorge’s waterfalls offer spectacular hikes and envy-worthy photo opportunities. The most well-known waterfall, Multnomah Falls, is just the beginning. As a ribbon of water plummets 620 feet, it’s the second highest year-round waterfall in the U.S.

Visit Multnomah Falls when you explore the Columbia River Gorge with kids.
Multnomah Falls is a must, if the parking lot is full, come back in the late afternoon. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Located at exit 31, the U.S. Forest Service Rangers hand out Columbia River Gorge Junior Ranger booklets for the kids and award niffy patches at the visitor center. I walked through Multnomah Falls Lodge next to the falls, with a regionally-inspired menu along with a separate bar. Restrooms, a snack bar and a gift shop offer the necessities.

Hike to the Benson Bridge, a .25-mile hike from the visitor center, an option for most visitors. Or take the 1.2-mile hike to the top of the falls, don’t forget the water bottle.

Explore the waterfalls when you visit Columbia River Gorge with kids.
Latourell Falls offers fewer crowds and a convenient parking lot a few miles from Multnomah Falls. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Don’t skip the other waterfalls along the Columbia River Scenic Highway (Hwy. 30), the crowds diminish and scenery increases.

Latourell Falls, located in Guy W. Talbot State Park, features a 249-foot plunge fall a short hike from the parking lot.

Bridal Veil Falls also requires a short hike, one mile west of exit 28 off Interstate 84. Visitors gaze at the tiered waterfall set in a mossy forest.

Visit Horsetail Falls when you explore Columbia River Gorge with kids.
Horsetail Falls is another waterfall to visit along the Columbia River Gorge. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The Wah-kee-na Falls, .5 miles west of Multnomah Falls, translates into most beautiful from the Yakama language. A 242-foot tiered waterfall awaits with a nearby picnic area.

Horsetail Falls, 2.5 miles east of Multnomah Falls, offers a 176-foot waterfall steps from the highway.

Best Places to Watch the Sunset

Might not be the Oregon coast though I found a couple of spots to catch the sunset. Stop by the Vista House at Crown Point, a memorial dedicated to the Oregon pioneers and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in 1918, it’s perched 733 feet above the Columbia River and the setting sun casts an amber glow in its windows.

Mount Hood stands as a beacon along the Columbia River Gorge, rising up from the evergreen landscape with glaciers and year-round skiing. An easy drive allows families to explore the area, a quick drive from the Columbia River Gorge.

Explore Timberline Lodge when you visit Columbia River Gorge with kids.
The Timberline Lodge on Mount Hood is a historic national park lodge. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

While on Mount Hood, walk through Timberline Lodge. The historic national park lodge is a must lovers of the parkitecture, Timberline Lodge offers its guests rustic elegance. With six sides, the four-story building features a central fireplace, handmade furnishings and wood carvings throughout the lobby.

Lodging along the Columbia River Gorge 

During my visit, I stayed at the Cousins Country Inn in The Dalles. The conveniently located  off Interstate 84, it offers all the necessities a Mom needs, like self-service laundry and a pool for the kids.

With a restaurant located onsite, I appreciated the convenience of home-style meals. My kids couldn’t be over their cinnamon rolls as big as a plate.

Hood River, Oregon, is another option for lodging, located about halfway through the Columbia River Gorge. Close to the western edge of the gorge is Portland, Oregon, with numerous lodging and dining options.

Where’s the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

Columbia River Gorge starts 30 miles east of Portland, Oregon, along Interstate 84. Portland offers the closest international airport.

Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area is open 365-days a year and 24-hours a day. The National Park site is a fee-free area.

Interstate 84 runs the length of the scenic area though I recommend exiting and driving the Columbia River Scenic Highway.

Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument is a quick 80 miles north along Interstate 5. Lewis and Clark National Historical Park gives kids a further understanding of the 1805 expedition with numerous sites at the mouth of the Columbia River, 120 miles west. Oregon Caves National Monument and Crater Lake National Park offer more national park sites to explore.

Know Before You Go: 

  • Grab your fresh fruit first before passing it to the back seat. Kids can vacuum pounds of fresh fruit in minutes.
  • Lavender can give some people headaches in high concentrations, like the car ride home.
  • If parking is unavailable at Multnomah Falls, tour nearby Bridal Veil Falls and circle back around.
  • Look out for banana slugs near the waterfalls, slugs the size and color of a banana.

More Information:

I recommend the Moon Guides for more information. I own several and use them to research my trips.

Disclosure: 

Consideration for brands mentioned. This post contains affiliate links.

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Take Epic Expedition with Explorers in the Pacific Northwest

Explore Fort Clatsop with Kids.
Discover the Columbia River like the legendary explorers, Lewis and Clark. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

After exploring the U.S. and the majority of Canada with my three kids, 9, 13 and 14, I’m still amazed by what fascinates them. I thought historical sites about explorers would be a hard sell.

Not so. My boys, 9 and 13, knew more about Lewis and Clark than I did. Of course, they were hooked after the park ranger fired off an antique musket at our first stop.

Who are Lewis and Clark?

Explore Fort Clatsop with kids.
Retrace the steps of Lewis and Clark’s expedition at Fort Clatsop in Oregon. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The famous explorers that charted the western U.S. after the Louisiana Purchase. President Thomas Jefferson dispatched Merriweather Lewis and William Clark, both in their early 30s, to discover a water passage to the Pacific Ocean.

Starting in 1804, Lewis and Clark along with the other men of the Corps of Discovery, set out from St. Louis, Missouri, headed west to the Pacific Ocean. Not until November 1805 did the Lewis and Clark Expedition plus Sacagawea and her baby reach the Pacific Ocean across uncharted territory.

Explore Fort Clatsop with kids.
Explore Fort Clatsop at the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park with your kids to learn about fur trading and the Corps of Discovery. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Needing a place to spend the winter, they built Fort Clatsop at the mouth of the Columbia River. For three months, the Corps of Discovery sewed moccasins, hunted and made salt in preparation for the trip back. In March 1806, they left for St. Louis.

Family Fun at the Lewis & Clark National Historical Park

During our visit we stopped by the visitor center at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park at Fort Clatsop first. With an introductory movie and an interpretive area, my kids got the basic history of the expedition.

Explore Fort Clatsop with kids.
Kids learn about primitive fort life in 1800s at Fort Clatsop. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Next we hiked to the replica of the wooden Fort Clatsop that features living history demonstrations. We explored the fort to see how the Corps of Discovery lived, learned about fur trading and the woolen Hudson Bay blankets used in trading.

To my boys’ delight, our costumed ranger loaded up an antique musket. With a blast of fire and a boom that rumbled through the forest, the ranger fired off the rifle. My boys wanted to enlist as explorers on the spot, instead we explored more Lewis and Clark sites.

Explore Fort Clatsop with kids.
The costumed Park Ranger demonstrated the firing of an antique musket during our visit. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

During the summer, ranger programming is offered from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. most days at the fort. Several different programs are offered and the schedule is available at the visitor center.

Fort Clatsop with Kids

Discover Fort Clatsop with kids.
My kids knew more about Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery than I did. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The Junior Ranger Program is the go-to program for families to learn more about a National Park Service site. It’s free and takes about two hours to complete. My kids love the badges that the Park Rangers present them after completing their booklets.

To earn the Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks Junior Ranger patch, grab an age-based booklet at the visitor center and complete required activities. The Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks Junior Ranger patches comes with rank patches based on the number of Lewis and Clark sites kids visit.

Explore Fort Clatsop with kids and earn a Junior Ranger badge.
Explore Lewis and Clark sites in Oregon and Washington to earn a Junior Ranger patch with a special rank patch. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Complete seven activities in the Junior Ranger booklet and visit one site to earn the rank of Private. Visit two sites to earn the rank of Sergeant, three sites to earn the rank of Captain and visit four sites to earn the rank of President. Some of the sites are in Washington, across the Astoria Bridge.

Hiking at the Lewis and Clark Parks

Fort-to-Sea Trail offers a 6.5-mile path from Fort Clatsop to the Pacific Ocean. It retraces the route that the Corps of Discovery took from Fort Clatsop to the ocean and to Netul Landing along the river.

Fort Stevens State Park offers hiking paths north of the Lewis and Clark National and State Parks. Sunset Beach State Recreation area offers hiking as well, both in Oregon.

Cape Disappointment in State Park in Washington offers hiking. I found hiking at Fort Columbia State Park in Washington as well.

Other sites to explore about Lewis and Clark

Explore the Pacific Northwest to retrace the steps of the legendary explorers, Lewis and Clark, with your kids with eight sites across Oregon and Washington.

The Lewis and Clark National and State Parks is a collection of national and state park sites dedicated to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Located on both sides of the Columbia River in Washington and Oregon, start at the main visitor center at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park in Astoria, Oregon, or Cape Disappointment State Park in Washington.

Though several Lewis and Clark Expedition sites preserve the history across the western U.S. Along with the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail that retraces the route from St. Louis to the Pacific Ocean across present-day Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

Explore the Lewis and Clark sites with kids in Washington.
Members of the Corps of Discovery made salt from ocean water with this oven to preserve meat. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Oregon:

  • Fort Clatsop at the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park—one of the main visitor centers
  • Netul Landing—along the Lewis and Clark River
  • Fort Stevens State Park—visit the 1906 wreck of the Peter Iredale along the beach.
  • Salt Works—where the Corps of Discovery made salt from ocean water to preserve meat.
  • Ecola State Park—Captain Clark and Sacagawea trekked to this area.
Explore Fort Clatsop with kids along with the beaches of the Pacific.
A safe and navigable route to the Pacific Ocean lead Lewis and Clark across the continent in the early 1800s. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Washington:

  • Cape Disappointment State Park— one of the main visitor centers and offers a full-service state park.
  • Fort Columbia State Park—home to the Chinook Indians and the coastal defense fort.
  • Dismal Notch—a landing spot for the Corps of Discovery along the Columbia River.

Where’s Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

Located at 92343 Fort Clatsop Road in Astoria, Lewis and Clark National Historical Park is open seven days a week (closed December 25). Summer hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and until 5 p.m. during the rest of the year. Use an annual pass or pay $5 per person for adults, 16+ (kids under 15 are free).

Know Before You Go:

  • Be prepared for rain at any time.
  • Limited food service at the park sites so pack a picnic.
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Hike like an Ewok in California’s Redwoods

Take a hike as one of the things to do with kids in the Redwoods.
Explore Redwood National and State Parks with your family to meet the tallest trees on the planet. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Kids love records and it doesn’t matter if it’s tallest or shortest most days. On a recent road trip up the California coast from San Francisco, my kids discovered the tallest trees. Then we learned the ancient, or old growth redwoods, are tallest trees in the world and the tallest living things on our planet.

Redwood National and State Parks

Hike a trail as one of the things to do in the Redwoods with kids.
The redwood groves offer family-friendly hikes where Ewoks once played. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Until 1800, approximately 2 million acres of redwood forests covered California’s northern coast. Then the gold rush started to tarnish and logging became the next gold mine.

California preserved the remaining redwoods in 1923 when it created the first of three state parks. In 1968, Redwood National Park extended the area of protection to link all the state parks and in 1978, the park expanded further. In 1980, the United Nations designated Redwood National and State Parks as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Hike the Lady Bird Johnson Grove as one of the things to do in the Redwoods with kids.
Explore the Lady Bird Johnson Grove, a former first lady, during your trip. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Three types of redwoods exist yet only one type grows in the Redwood National and State Parks. With bark that measures 12-inches thick, redwoods have no known diseases or suffer from insect damage.

  • The Coast Redwoods are the tallest trees in the world and located along the northern California coast. They are the tallest variety with heights over 370 feet from a seed the size of a tomato’s.
  • The Giant Sequoias are located on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range in Central California. They are bulkier with thicker trunks yet not as tall.
  • The Dawn Redwoods were thought to be extinct, yet discovered in 1944 in Central China.

6 Things to do in the Redwoods with Kids

Redwood National and State Parks offers lots of recreation options for families.

Take your family to a mysterious land where Ewoks once played. After that kids can spot a Roosevelt Elk or hop on their bikes in a favorite national park in northern California.

Scenic Drives

If limited on time, the scenic routes offer glimpses of the magnificent redwood forests. Drive down Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway, a 10-mile paved road that parallels U.S. Route 101, for some of the best tree viewing. The Enderts Beach Road is a 2-mile road that offers amazing views of the coastline near Crescent Beach.

Family Hikes

Hiking always tops my list. During our visit, we hiked the Lady Bird Johnson Grove Trail, a 1-mile loop off Bald Hills Road. The path meanders through a fern-covered grove where the dedication of Redwood National Park took place.

For families with younger kids, try the Ah-Pah Interpretive Trail, a .3-mile walk off Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway. This trail takes visitors through the rehabilitation process after logging.

Cycling

Redwood National Park offers back-country cycling on rehabilitated logging roads, one of just a few parks that allow this. Check in at the visitor center for a brochure and current conditions.

Widlife Viewing

The Roosevelt Elk herd graze in the Orick area. Catch a glimpse in the spring and fall, especially during the elk rut in the fall. The annual mating ritual when males battle each other for the right to mate.

Tide Pooling

Bring the water shoes and check out the tide charts so kids can explore a tiny marine world. The best place to find a tide pool is Enderts Beach, .5-mile hike from the Crescent Beach Overlook. Whale watching from the shore is best in November and March during the gray whale migration.

Organized Tours

Elk Meadows Cabins can arrange guided tours like family horseback riding and kayak tours. Rent mountain bikes and arrange a guided trip. Or reserve a fresh and salt water fishing excursion or a birding tour.

Redwoods with Kids

The Junior Ranger Program is the go-to program for families to learn more about Redwood National Park. It’s free and takes about two hours to complete. My kids love the badges that the park rangers present them after completing their booklets.

The Redwood Junior Ranger booklet is the same for ages 4 and up. Kids complete the number of activities in the booklet based on their age. A ranger program is not required to earn this junior ranger badge though visiting a tide pool or taking a hike in the redwoods is encouraged.

The California State Parks offers a Junior Ranger program for kids visiting the Jedediah Smith Visitor Center or the Prairie Creek Visitor Center.

Lodging in the Redwood National and State Parks

Stay in a Cabin as one of the things to do in the Redwoods with kids.
Redwood National and State Parks offers limited lodging in the area so we stayed at the Elk Meadows Cabins. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

During my visit to Redwood National and State Parks, I reserved a cabin at the Elk Meadow Cabins ($$-$$$). Located three miles north of Orick, California, Elk Meadow Cabins offers six three-bedroom, two-bath cabins that I would describe as a small house instead of a cabin. They line a short street right off U.S. Route 101 in an area that has a resident herd of Roosevelt Elk.

Outfitted with all the necessities a family needs, I found this house a charming place to stay for a couple of days. This area of California is remote and the Elk Meadow Cabins offers an excellent location to base your Redwood National and State Parks excursions.

Stay in a cabin as one of the things to do in Redwoods with kids
Stay in a cozy cabin in the Redwood State and National Park on the northern California Coast. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

With homespun charm, my cabin featured two bedrooms with a queen bed each and one bedroom perfect for kids with a pair of twin beds. One bathroom included a tub for the kids who bath and the other bathroom had a shower and stackable washer and dryer.

Stay in a cabin as one of the things to do in Redwoods with kids.
My cabin offered three cozy bedrooms decorated with charming quilts. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The kitchen included all the necessary cooking equipment for a family, including a dishwasher. During our stay, I opted to grill outside since it’s a kid-pleaser and easy-to-clean up for Mom. I found a grill on the back deck along with a table for dining al fresco. Grab groceries before heading out to Redwood National Park.

Our cabin featured cable television and Wi-Fi but my kids played outside until dark. Bring the bikes or kayaks, the cabins feature a small garage for storing your toys. Elk Meadow Cabins offers a community fire pit and Jacuzzi.

Grill up some dinner as one of the things to do in the Redwoods with kids.
Stop by the grocery store and grill up dinner on the outside grill or use the fully-stocked kitchen. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Where’s Redwood National and State Parks

Redwood National and State Parks are located along U.S. Route 101 in Northern California. From the south, Thomas H. Kuchel Visitor Center, 2 miles west from Orick, California, is 312 miles north of San Francisco. On the north side of the park, the Jedediah Smith Visitor Center in Crescent City, California, is 322 miles south of Portland, Oregon.

Redwood National and State Parks is 63 miles to Oregon Caves National Park, 170 miles to Crater Lake National Park and 185 miles to Lassen National Volcanic National Park.

Details for Redwood National and State Parks

Redwood National and State Parks are open 365-days a year and 24-hours a day. The Redwood National Park is a fee-free area. Though Jedediah Smith Redwood State Park, Del Norte Coast Redwood State Park and Prairie Creek Redwood State Park collect day-use fees at their respective campgrounds.

U.S. Route 101 runs north and south though the Redwood National and State Parks. Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway offers a scenic drive and several unpaved roads offer beach access. Though trailers are prohibited.

More Information:

I recommend the Moon Guides if you need more information.

Disclosure: 

Consideration for brands mentioned. This post contains affiliate ads.

Know Before You Go: 

  • When exploring the beach, never turn your back to the ocean. Sneaker waves can occur at any time.
  • Rip currents are strong currents that can occur at anytime. Put the kids in life jackets.
  • If exploring the tide pools, remember rising tides can cut off access.
  • If you feel a strong earthquake, move to higher ground in case of Tsunami.
  • Ticks carrying Lyme disease have been found in the Redwood National and State Parks.
  • Know how to identify Poison Oak; it can be found along the trails.
  • Best places to restock: stop at Crescent City, California if driving down from the north and McKinleyville, California, if arriving from the south.
  • Give Roosevelt Elk space, they are unpredictable animals that weigh 1,000 pounds.
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9 Must Dos for Family Fun on San Juan Island

Explore Friday Harbor as one to the things to do on San Juan Island with kids.
Friday Harbor on San Juan Island offers a picturesque town to explore, steps from the ferry. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Along the Canadian border in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, I discovered San Juan Island with my family. With a temperate summer climate, shoreline whale watching and family-friendly activities, like hiking and glamping, San Juan Island offers an ideal destination. With a slow, island pace families can explore by bike, or even kayak, to all the things to do on San Juan Island with kids.

San Juan Island National Historical Park 

San Juan Island National Historical Park celebrates the success of peaceful arbitration between the United States and Great Britain. In 1871, they settled the ownership of San Juan Island with the help of Germany.

Explore San Juan National Historical Park is one of the things to do on San Juan Island with kids.
Explore the National Park site on San Juan Island for a few hours. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

With two separate locations on opposite sides of San Juan Island, the American Camp and the English Camp, visitors can learn all about the land dispute of 1859. When a British pig rooting around in an American vegetable garden nearly started a war.

For 12 years, the island remained under peaceful joint military occupation. Then in 1871, Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany ruled that San Juan Island belonged the U.S. Months later, the British moved out, leaving a civilized camp complete with a formal garden.

American Camp 

Explore American Camp as one of the things to do on San Juan Island with kids.
Take a hike with the kids to the beach at American Camp. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

American Camp features family hikes through wildflower dotted prairies to the South Beach. The six-mile rocky beach offers orca viewing in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Visit Grandma’s Cove during low tide for tide pool opportunities.

Located at 4668 Cattle Point Road on the southern peninsula, stop by the year-round visitor center for maps and Junior Ranger booklets. Picnic tables are located at the visitor center along with the restrooms. The visitor center is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the park is open from dawn to 11 p.m.

English Camp

Explore English Camp as one of the things to do on San Juan with kids.
Enjoy the formal gardens of the English Camp while the kids run around. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

English Camp offers more historic buildings including the barracks, commissary, block house and formal garden. If time permits the hike to Bell Point offer views of Garrison and Westcott bays.

The visitor center at English Camp is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the summer at 3905 W. Valley Rd.

San Juan Island National Historical Park’s grounds are open 365 days a year from dawn until 11 p.m. The San Juan Island National Historical Park is fee-free park site.

Kids at San Juan Island National Historical Park

Earn a Junior Ranger patch as one of the things to do on San Juan Island with kids.
Kids can earn a patch at San Juan Island National Historical Park when they complete a Junior Ranger booklet. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The Junior Ranger Program is the go-to program for families to learn more about San Juan Island National Historical Park. It’s free and takes about two hours to complete. My kids love the patches that the Rangers present them after completing their booklets.

To earn the San Juan Island National Historical Park Junior Ranger badge, kids need to watch the park video, located in the visitor center at both locations. Kids will need to take a hike and complete the same amount of activities in the Junior Ranger booklet as their age.

San Juan Island in Washington is a secret getaway that my family adored with whale watching, a lighthouse, lavender fields and the perfect place to glamp in style. Family memories in the making just an hour from the mainland.

San Juan Island National Historical Park offers a traditional Junior Ranger badge along with an embroidered patch. The Historic Preservation Junior Ranger badge and the Underwater Explorer badge can be earned at San Juan Island National Historical Park as well.

9 Things To Do on San Juan Island with Kids

Add the ferry ride to the things to do San Juan Island with kids.
The ferry ride to San Juan Island is fun for the kids. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Getting to San Juan Island is part of the fun, the Washington State Ferry excited my kids since we drove our SUV onboard. We parked and explored the ferry during our passage that takes about an hour.

San Juan Island doesn’t have stop lights and there’s a 45 mph speed limit across the island. Adventurous families could bike around the island.

During my visit to San Juan Island, we stopped at The Whale Museum. Ideal for kids who yearn to learn about the whales seen from the shore. It’s a quick tour and can be explored in an hour. Located at 62 First Street in Friday Harbor, adult admission is $6, kids 5 to 18 enter for $3 and kids under five enter for free.

Walk in a field of lavender as one of the things to do on San Juan with kids.
Walking in a field of lavender tops my summer must do list. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Lavender fields swaying in the gentle breezes of San Juan Island is nothing short of a watercolor landscape. During my visit, I stopped at Pelindaba Lavender, located at 45 Hawthorne Lane, to enjoy the annual Lavender Festival held in July.

I found the premier location to scout for orca whales at Lime Kiln Point State Park. A quick hike from the parking lot, visitors can occasionally see a pod of orca whales from the shore. Check in at the 1919 lighthouse for the most recent information about sightings.

Explore Lime Kiln State Park while on San Juan Island.
Lime Kiln Point State Park features a lighthouse and offers whale watching from the beach. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Admission is $10 for a one-day Washington Discovery Pass or $30 for an annual pass. Lime Kiln Point State Park is open from 8 a.m. to dusk during the summer season and located at 1567 Westside Road.

My kids love animals and I love to knit so we stopped at Krystal Acres Alpaca Farm, located at 3501 West Valley Road. With cuddly alpacas and a store packed with clothing and yarn, it’s a family-friendly stop.

I love art and my kids needed to run around so I stopped at the Sculpture Park, near Roche Harbor. I found a 20-acre sculpture park with 150 works on five marked trails, including a sand pit for kids to create their own art. Donations suggested.

Glamping on San Juan Island

During my visit to San Juan Island, I glamped at Lakedale Resort. My family had a canvas cottage ($$) along the shore of Neva Lake.

Lakedale Resort is one of the best places to camp with kids in Washington.
Take a moment and  enjoy the glassy lake at Lakedale Resort. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The centerpiece of my canvas cottage was the chandelier that I never knew I needed until I had one. I especially loved looking at it from my king-sized bed dressed with flannel bedding. And did I mention my canvas cottage had decorative throw pillows, I found lots of them.

The front of our cottage overlooked the lake with a large deck inches off the water. With a wall of bug netting we left the front open for our entire stay, just an incredible view first thing in the morning.

Enjoy the deck of the Canvas Cottage, one of the best places to camp with kids in Washington.
With a large deck on the water, we enjoyed dinner al fresco. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The canvas cottage includes a twin-sized daybed outfitted with a trundle underneath and bedding. My kids loved sleeping on the trundle and day bed.

I found a large and bright bathroom that features a jumbo shower head with hot water. The bathroom includes a dressing area with a full-length mirror and a closet rod. The pedestal sink featured plenty of light to apply make-up and I even found a blow dryer.

Since Lakedale Resort is heavily treed, I didn’t see the RV or tent campsites from my site. I let my older kids explore on their own on the loaner bikes.

Enjoy family fun at Lakedale, the best place to camp with kids in Washington.
My kids found a ton of fun at Lakedale Resort on San Juan Island, like boats to rent, games and crafts. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

My kids found lots of activities just for them like games and crafts. I found a complimentary breakfast at the mess tent in the morning. So incredible helpful when trying to feed the kids and make it to the ferry on time.

Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes, is 5 miles from the Friday Harbor Ferry Terminal. It features a 10-room lodge, two pet-friendly log cabins, canvas cabins and cottages, a vintage Airstream and standard camping and RV sites.

Where’s the San Juan Island National Historical Park

During my visit, I took the Washington State Ferry to Friday Harbor from Anacortes, Washington, 85 miles north of Seattle via Interstate 5. It was easy to load up my SUV and head to the top deck for a scenic ride.

For visitors without cars, floatplanes offer service to the San Juan Island from several locations including Sea-Tac (Seattle-Tacoma International Airport).

Friday Harbor offers plenty of moorage for boat owners.

More Information:

Looking for more detailed information, I suggest the following book.

Disclosure:

Consideration for brands listed. This post contains affiliate links.

Know Before You Go: 

  • Friday Harbor is your place for shopping on San Juan Island from groceries to souvenirs.
  • I found all I needed for a picnic and a camp fire cookout at the grocery store.
  • Reservations for the Washington State Ferry are highly recommended, only 10% of the ferry capacity is available for drive-up passage.
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How to Fall in Love with Glamping at Lakedale

Lakedale Resort is one of the best places to camp with kids in Washington.
Take a moment to sit in an Adirondack chair and enjoy the glassy lake at Lakedale Resort. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

I love camping with my three kids, I just hate pitching a tent. My kids scurry like woodland mice when the tent comes out. I wanted to share the best place to camp with kids in Washington. At Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes on San Juan Island, I got all the camping l love, like making s’mores and listening to the frogs, without the hassle of a tent or sleeping on the cold, hard ground.

Best Place to Camp with Kids in Washington

Nestled in a quiet forest a quick 10-minute drive from the Friday Harbor Ferry terminal, Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes on San Juan Island tops my family’s list as the best place to camp with kids in Washington. As I sit on my private deck along the shores of their emerald lake, the tiniest of twinkles reminds me this isn’t a postcard.

On its glassy surface, the evergreen forest reflects in one of the three lakes at the Lakedale Resort. I have all that’s necessary for relaxation on the San Juan Islands, Washington’s getaway just an hour away by ferry. Lakedale Resort offers oodles of family amenities like kids crafts, free loaner bikes, paddle boats for rent, Ping-Pong and tetherball, just to name a few.

Lakedale Resort provides free loader bikes and is the best place to camp with kids in Washington.
With free loaner bikes, my kids hopped on to discover Lakekdale Resort on their own. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

What My Kids loved at Lakedale Resort

  • The free loaner bikes
  • The laid-back atmosphere with lots of activities.
  • They tried out a paddle board and a row boat, both for rent by the hour.

What I loved at Lakedale Resort

  • Utility sink to wash dishes.
  • Complimentary breakfast at the mess tent for canvas cabins and cottages guests.
  • Amazing bed with a chandelier above in our cottage.
  • A private bathroom with a shower in our cottage.

Lakedale Resort for Families

Enjoy family fun at Lakedale, the best place to camp with kids in Washington.
My kids found a ton of fun at Lakedale Resort on San Juan Island. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes is 5 miles from the Friday Harbor Ferry Terminal. It features a 10-room lodge, two pet-friendly log cabins, canvas cabins and cottages, a vintage Airstream and standard camping and RV sites.

Lakedale Resort has three lakes with swimming beaches though it doesn’t have a swimming pool. It’s quiet resort so I let my older kids explore on their own.

The resort is heavily treed so I didn’t see the RV or tent campsites from my site and Lakedale Resort never felt crowded even though it was full.

My Canvas Cottage at Lakedale Resort

Enjoy the deck of the Canvas Cottage, one of the best places to camp with kids in Washington.
With a large deck on the water, we enjoyed dinner al fresco at our Canvas Cottage. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The centerpiece of my canvas cottage ($$) was the chandelier. I never knew I needed a chandelier while camping until I had a chandelier while camping. Looking at it from my king-sized bed dressed with flannel bedding with lots decorative throw pillows made me forget I was camping.

I melted into the foam mattress and I don’t think I even turned over. A pair of bedside tables outfitted with lamps shaped like branches held my summer reading. I found a battery-operated lantern and a flashlight to use along with a battery-operated alarm clock. Close to the bed was an additional outlet for charging my phone.

Dig the stinky tent and sleeping on the ground. Enjoy a view, a king-sized bed with a chandelier overhead.

The front of our cottage overlooked the lake with a large deck inches off the water. With a wall of bug netting we left the front open for our entire stay. Just an incredible view to wake up to first thing in the morning.

The canvas cottages include a daybed outfitted a trundle underneath. A cocktail table sits in front of the daybed that holds the extra bedding for the kids. I also found a coat rack and a decorative fireplace with a remote control.

Lakedale Resort canvas cottages feature bathrooms, the best place to camp with kids in Washington.
Behind the king-sized bed is the spacious bathroom. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The canvas cottage is spacious and includes a rectangular table with four chairs that sits on a decorative rug. I found two chairs on the deck and another picnic table outside.

The Bathroom Situation at Lakedale Resort

My canvas cottage’s bathroom featured a jumbo shower head with hot water in a large and bright room. The bathroom area included a dressing area with a full-length mirror with hangers along a closet rod and a storage console.

Enjoy a hot shower in the canvas cottage at Lakedale Resort, the best place to camp with kids in Washington.
A hot shower is a must for me when I’m glamping. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

My canvas cottage included plenty of towels for my family along with a signature line of toiletries including shampoo, conditioner, body wash, lotion and hand wash. The mirror over the sink provided plenty of light to apply make up along with a hair dryer and a low-flow toilet. The bathroom lacks heat and a bathtub though I didn’t need either.

Family Fun at Lakedale Resort

Lakedale Resort keeps kids in mind for the summer season. My kids found the activities tent before I did. As home base for kids at Lakedale Resort, it’s stocked with free crafts as well as crafts for purchase, like tye-dye t-shirts or birdhouses. A schedule of activities is available at the general store.

Kids enjoy crafts at Lakedale Resort, the best place to camp with kids in Washington.
My kids found the Activities Tent packed with crafts before I did. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

 

After the Activities Tent, my kids ran to the General Store  while I checked in at the lodge. At Lakedale Resort’s general store, my kids found ice cream, hotdogs and the stuff to make our campfire change colors.

My kids borrowed complimentary bikes from a rack in front of the general store. They explored the resort by bike and found a gaming area with a giant chess set, a volleyball net, horseshoes, bocce ball and a Ping-Pong table.

With a three lakes on property, it’s hard to choose between the paddle board, the rowboat, the paddle boat, the single or double kayak, all for rent by the hour. Life vests are available too.

What to Eat at Lakedale Resort

The canvas cottages and canvas cabins feature a fire pits with attached grills for cooking up meals. I brought my camp stove and made hot dogs for dinner and saved the fire pit for s’mores.

My site also included a round table with an umbrella next to the fire pit. I used the rectangular table with four chairs inside of the canvas cottage to eat and I used the round one for cooking.

Enjoy a campfire at Lakedale Resort, the best place to camp with kids in Washington.
Pack the marshmallows for s’mores for the kids. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Don’t feel like cooking? The general store sells grab-and-go items in their cooler, like sandwiches and wraps. They also make hotdogs and pizza. In the morning, I found a full coffee bar and hot pancakes.

Guests in the Canvas Cottages and Canvas Cabins are welcome to enjoy the complimentary Breakfast Tent. I found an area stocked with a full selection of continental breakfast delights, like oatmeal, fresh fruit and assorted breakfast breads.

More than Glamping at Lakedale Resort

Lakedale Resort features a 10-room lodge for adults-only that’s open year-round. I found two log cabins at Lakedale Resort, one sleeps six and the other sleep ten. Both are pet-friendly.

The canvas cottages feature bathrooms and king-sized beds and Lakedale Resort offers seven. The canvas cabins include a queen-sized bed without electricity or bathrooms and Lakedale Resort has 14.

Tent camping and RV sites are available along with one vintage Airstream. All the camping options are open from April 1 until September 30.

Family Fun in Washington:

Explore Lime Kiln State Park while on San Juan Island.
Lime Kiln State Park features a lighthouse and offers whale watching from the beach. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

During our visit to Washington, we explored the San Juan National Historical Park with two separate camps on the island. Along with national park sites, we whale watched at Lime Kiln State Park and picked lavender at Pelindaba Lavender.

For national park lovers, Olympic National Park offers days of family fun with mountain meadows, tide pools and rainforest trails along with historic lodges in the nearby Olympic Peninsula. My kids loved Mt. St. Helens National Volcanic Monument as well.

Disclosure: 

Consideration for brands mentioned. This post contains affiliate links.

Know Before You Go: 

  • I didn’t have cell service at Lakedale.
  • Make a reservation for the Anacortes Ferry during the summer and arrive early.
  • Bring another lantern, it gets dark and its nice for the deck at night.
  • I found a utility sink located outside of the shower house, making clean up dinner dishes a snap.
  • My kids used their sleeping bags on the trundle and day bed.
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Stay with the Woodland Animals in a Charming Cedar Chateau

Spend the night at Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
Enjoy a night at Oregon Caves Chateau with kids after exploring its cave. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

After exploring the marble halls of Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve, we checked in to the Oregon Caves Chateau with kids, a National Historic Landmark and part of the PBS series, Great Lodges of the National Parks. Another charming addition to my collection of historic properties stays, I found this lodge packed with quaint woodland details and creatures.

Enjoy the Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
Explore the cave then check in to the Oregon Caves Chateau with kids of the night. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

What I loved at the Oregon Caves Chateau

  • The sense of history with Monterey Furniture pieces throughout.
  • The lobby offers an evening respite and a place to meet fellow travelers.
  • The Northwest-inspired menu in the dining room exceeded my expectations.

What I wanted at the Oregon Caves Chateau

  • The restaurant needs a historic renovation.
  • Updated wall colors and carpet through the property

The Oregon Caves Chateau with kids

Enjoy the Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
The lobby provides lots of seating for reading books, playing games and sharing a glass of wine and adventures. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

After winding in and around a southern Oregon national forest for more than an hour, we see the rustic park sign announcing our destination, Oregon Caves National Monument. While my boys love climbing through mountain caves, I’m here for the historic hotel, The Oregon Caves Chateau. Another national park lodge to add to my collection of stays that include Bright Angel Lodge in Grand Canyon to Lake Quinault Lodge in Olympic and the Inn at Furnace Creek in Death Valley.

Built in 1934 by local contractor, Gust Lium, the cedar bark-covered, six-story building with 10 sides is part of the rustic picturesque architectural style. Set in a ravine, the building hugs the sides of the steep landscape with rock work completed by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC).

Enjoy the Monterey Furniture antiques at Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
I sat down at the Monterey Furniture desk to write my postcards. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Throughout the Chateau, I found Monterey Furniture pieces. Made in California from the 1930s until the 1940s, their furniture used Oregon adler wood and design influences from Spanish Colonial and California Mission styles.

The Oregon Caves Chateau features the largest collection of Monterey Furniture from the early classic period. I found several pieces in the lobby and my room even included some pieces.

Enjoy Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
In our room we found a journal with guests’ entries including this kid’s plea. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

The lobby’s fireplace dominates the space and offers a place to enjoy a book or board game after a day of exploring the caves. With a wall of cottage-inspired windows on the creekside of the lobby, natural light floods the room. Adjacent to the main lobby, I found a kids playroom stocked with games and books.

My Room at The Oregon Caves Chateau

Enjoy the Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
I reserved a deluxe corner room with two double beds at the Oregon Caves Chateau with kids. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

I reserved a corner room overlooking the creek with two double beds. With a room packed with Monterey Furniture antiques and charming quilts, I instantly felt welcomed. We even spotted several deer from our room in the late afternoon.

The beds were comfy and reminded me of my grandmother’s house. My room included a dressing table along with a round table with a pair of chairs where my kids worked on their Junior Ranger booklets.

Enjoy a room at the Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
The Deluxe rooms at the Oregon Caves Chateau feature Monterey Furniture antiques from the 1930s. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Though my room didn’t include air-conditioning, I felt comfortable during my July stay. My room didn’t feature a phone, TV or Wi-Fi and I didn’t miss them. After relaxing in our room for a bit we walked downstairs to enjoy the common areas.

My Bathroom at Oregon Caves Chateau

I live in a 95-year-old house, the terms vintage and original make me giddy. The bathroom transported me back in time but I’m a romantic.

I love the vintage bathroom at Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
I love a vintage bathroom with original fixtures though it’s not for everyone. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

With original fixtures, I found the the bathroom quaint. It performs its duty instead of offering an island of relaxation. After all, I’m in the middle of a national forest over an hour from any towns.

I found enough towels from my family of four along with standard toiletries.

Dining at The Oregon Caves Chateau with kids

During my stay at the Oregon Caves Chateau with kids, we dined overlooking the creek in the historic property. From the large windows, I watched the sun slowly disappear into maze of fir trees. A perfect way to end a day of exploring.

Spend the night at Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
Since the Chateau features six floors, we walk downstairs to the Dining Room. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

In a room that I thought needs a historic restoration, I found the entrees and service better than I expected.

With a menu infused with Northwest-inspired entrees, the flat iron steak, bison meatloaf and rainbow trout tempted me along with seasonal salads. The dining room also features Oregon wines and cheese.

Enjoy dinner in the Dining Room at the Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
We split a Cave Rock Sundae since we hiked a few miles exploring Oregon Caves National Monument. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

My kids enjoyed an Italian soda topped with a mountain of whip cream. The Oregon Caves Chateau’s dining room features a kids’ menu with options like natural grass-fed burgers and local-made hot dogs. I found vegetables, salad and fruit for sides for the kids’ meals too.

For families wanting a quick bite, I found a coffee shop at the Oregon Caves Chateau.

Family Fun at the Oregon Caves Chateau          

Cave Tours

Reserve a tour at Oregon Caves National Monument, the Discovery Tour lasts a 1 ½ hours or take the Candlelight Tour for a historic, evening tour. For the adventurous, the Off-Trail Tour scrambles and squeezes through the cave for 3 hours.

Explore Oregon Caves National Monument with kids.
Explore the mysterious marble halls of Oregon Caves National Monument. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Hiking

The cave isn’t the only landscape to discover in the Siskiyou Mountains. I found several shaded trails to explore.

  • Cliff Nature Trail, a .7-mile trail from the cave exit to the visitor center with a 75-foot elevation gain.
  • Old Growth Trail, a 1.0-mile loop from the main parking lot to the visitor center
  • Big Tree Trail, a 3.3-mile loop is an ambitious hike with a 1,125-foot elevation gain.
  • No Name Trail, a 1.3-mile trail features waterfalls.
Enjoy the Oregon Caves Chateau with kids.
Take a hike with the kids along one of the trails that start from the Chateau. Photo Credit: Catherine Parker

Staying at Historic Properties in National Parks

I adore historic properties. With quaint details, from the woodwork and original tile work to the sloping floors and creaking doors, I always book a room at a park’s lodge since each is unique.

I evaluate these properties differently than I would a new hotel property. Most are seasonal properties that are shuttered over the winter and many employ students. A few properties offer luxury in remote locations and others pack in charm along with a pool, though those are the exception.

Looking for a place to stay after exploring Oregon Caves National Monument, I stayed at the Oregon Caves Chateau next door. If you love historic National Park Lodge then add it to your list for its rustic charm.

Most lodges don’t offer air-conditioning though most feature ceiling fans and windows that open. TVs are hard to find and the Wi-Fi is for checking emails only. I know this and don’t expect the modern day conveniences in some of the most remote locations in the U.S.

Pools are rare but hiking is usually right out the front door. Other activities, like horseback riding can be found at many locations too. I always take the free historic tours of the properties.

Most historic National Park Lodges feature large lobbies for enjoying your evening. With my kids, I grab a board game, usually stacked in a corner of the room, and enjoy the simplicity of a game night. Many guests sit by the fire and read a book. Others grab a glass of wine and discuss what they experienced. Some special lodges even provide live music in the evening.

Where’s the Oregon Caves Chateau

Oregon Caves Chateau is located at 20000 Caves Highway, Caves Junction, in southern Oregon. Complimentary guest parking is outside of the Chateau.

Oregon Caves National Monument is 145 miles from Crater Lake, 240 miles from Bend, Oregon, and 75 miles from Redwood National Park in California. Oregon Caves National Monument is a fee-free park site, admission for cave tours.

More information: 

Looking for more information on Oregon, I recommend Moon Travel Guides, I own several.

Disclosure: 

This post contains an affiliate link.

Know before you go:

  • I remind my kids to be gentle with the furnishings and the original doors in historic properties.
  • If you plan on visiting Oregon Caves National Monument you can not wear any clothing, this includes shoes, that’s been in another cave due to White-Nose Syndrome.
  • From Cave Junction, along U.S. Route 199, it takes 45 minutes to get to the Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve and the last few miles are a series of s-curves.
  • RV and travel trainers are not recommended beyond mile post 12 on Caves Highway.
  • Kids can’t be carried on cave tours.
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